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comedy | Santa Barbara Theatre of the Air - Part 2


Jun 30 2013

A Kind of Alaska

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The SBTA offers its repertory of radio productions for free download.

Not “old-time radio,” these are broadcast presentations of some of the world’s most gifted classic and contemporary playwrights: Anton Chekhov, George Bernard Shaw, Luigi Pirandello, Susan Glaspell, George Kelly, Noel Coward, Harold Pinter, Vaclav Havel, Eric Bentley, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Frank Gilroy, Jason Miller, Benjamin Bettenbender, Laura Cahill, Murray Schisgal and many others.

Each week a different radio comedy/drama will be podcast here.

Tune in! You may discover gems you never knew existed!

(Please note: To use our new audio player, click on button at left of play title.)

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Production 22:
A Kind of Alaska, by Harold Pinter (Drama)
Starring Alison Coutts-Jordan, Danielle Aubuchon and William Smithers
[Playing Time: 37:07]

(A woman awakes to a world she does not know.)

Harold Pinter (1930-2008) was an English playwright who achieved international success as one of the most complex post-World War II dramatists. Pinter’s plays are noted for their use of silence to increase tension, understatement, and cryptic small talk. Equally recognizable are the themes: nameless menace, erotic fantasy, obsession and jealousy, family hatred and mental disturbance. After years as an actor in provincial pinter-smallrepertory theatre under the pseudonym David Baron, Pinter began to write for the stage. The Room (1957), originally written for Bristol University’s drama department, was finished in four days. His first full-length play, The Birthday Party, was produced in 1958 in the West End and closed after disastrous reviews, but Harold Hobson wrote, “Mr. Pinter, on the evidence of this work, possesses the most original, disturbing and arresting talent in theatrical London.” In more than 30 plays – written between 1957 and 2000 and including masterworks like The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homecoming and Betrayal – Mr. Pinter captured the anxiety and ambiguity of life in the second half of the 20th century with terse, hypnotic dialogue filled with gaping pauses and the prospect of imminent violence. In 2005, Pinter was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. Along with another Nobel winner, Samuel Beckett, his friend and mentor, Mr. Pinter became one of the few modern playwrights whose names instantly evoke a sensibility. The adjective Pinteresque has become part of the cultural vocabulary as a byword for strong and unspecified menace. He was also publicly outspoken in his views on repression and censorship, at home and abroad. Pinter died of esophogeal cancer on Christmas Eve, 2008.

 

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FROM THE MINDS OF PLAYWRIGHTS:
You're on earth. There's no cure for that. - Samuel Beckett


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