Jul 26 2015

Gifts of the Magi & A Christmas Memory

 

 

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The SBTA offers its repertory of radio productions for free download.

Not “old-time radio,” these are broadcast presentations of some of the world’s most gifted classic and contemporary playwrights: Anton Chekhov, George Bernard Shaw, Luigi Pirandello, Susan Glaspell, George Kelly, Noel Coward, Harold Pinter, Vaclav Havel, Eric Bentley, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Frank Gilroy, Jason Miller, Benjamin Bettenbender, Laura Cahill, Murray Schisgal and many others.

Each week a different radio comedy/drama will be podcast here.

Tune in! You may discover gems you never knew existed!

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Gifts of the Magi, by O.Henry ~ adapted by John Quimby. (Drama)

Production 17:
Gifts of the Magi, by O. Henry – adapted by John Quimby (Drama)
Starring John Quimby, Bob Allen, Petrea Bouchard, Paula Kay, Dean Opperman and Mark DeAnda ~ AND ~
A Christmas Memory, by Truman Capote ~ adapted by Louise Latham. (Drama)
Starring Louise Latham and William Smithers
[Playing Time: 39:45]

(Stories of love and of childhood memory for the holiday season)

O. Henry, pseudonym of William Sydney Porter (1862-1910), was an American writer of short stories, best known for his ironic plot twists and surprise endings. Born and raised in Greensboro, North Carolina, O. Henry did not write professionally until he reached his mid-30s. In 1894 heo-henry-small founded a short-lived weekly humor magazine, The Rolling Stone. In 1896 O. Henry was charged with embezzling funds from the First National Bank of Austin, Texas, where he had worked from 1891 to 1894. He served three years of a five-year sentence at the federal penitentiary in Columbus, Ohio, where he first began to write short stories and use the pseudonym O. Henry. During the last ten years of his life, O. Henry became one of the most popular writers in America, publishing over 500 short stories in dozens of widely read periodicals. “Gifts of the Magi” (our current podcast) is one of his best-known works.

Truman Capote
, (1924-1984) was an American writer whose short stories, novels, plays and non-fiction are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a “non-fiction novel”. At least 20 films and television dramas have been produced from Capote novels, stories and screenplays. When he was four, his parents divorced, and he was sent to capote-smallMonroeville, AL, where he was raised by his mother’s relatives. He formed a fast bond with his mother’s distant relative, Nanny Rumbley Faulk, whom Truman called ‘Sook’. As a lonely child, Capote taught himself to read and write before he entered the first grade in school. At 17, Capote ended his formal education and began a two-year job at The New Yorker magazine. Between 1943 and 1946, he wrote a continual flow of short fiction. Capote remained a lifelong friend of his Monroeville neighbor Harper Lee, and he based the character of Idabel in Other Voices, Other Rooms on her. After the success of In Cold Blood, Capote’s publisher re-released his earlier works, including a 20th anniversary edition of Other Voices, Other Rooms and a holiday gift book edition of his 1956 story “A Christmas Memory” (our current podcast). In the late 1970s, Capote was in and out of rehab clinics, and news of his various breakdowns frequently reached the public. Capote died in Los Angeles, CA at the home of his old friend Joanne Carson, ex-wife of late-night TV host Johnny Carson, on whose program Capote had been a frequent guest. According to the coroner’s report the cause of death was “liver disease complicated by phlebitis and multiple drug intoxication.”

 

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FROM THE MINDS OF PLAYWRIGHTS:
I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train. - Oscar Wilde


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